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Lesser Spotted Eagle - Season 2017

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Friday, August 30, 2013

Lesser Spotted Eagle (LSE) season 2013 - incalculable risks by tagged LSE with satellite transmitter (fitting methods)


The LSE male with the name "Hercules" is hardworking with the procurement of small mammals - 21 August 2013.
"Hercules" in his "hiding-place" - 29 August 2013.
A successful hunting - 29 August 2013.
"Hercules" flying with a mouse back to his young Eagle "Frederic" - 30 July 2013.
The nice "Frederic" waiting of the mouse.... 28 August 2013.
Three weeks earlier... - 04 August 2013.
"Hercules" again and again in action... - 
Part 1 - Sitting in the leafy canopy - view like a Short-toed-Eagle... - 26 August 2013.
Part 2 - or sitting during the evening - 28 August 2013.
And here is "Peggy" the mom of "Frederic" in the morning mist - 21 August 2013.
Note the tagged "Peggy" with the satellite transmitter at back (since August 2012) - 29 August 2013.
"Peggy" go hunting..... - 20 August 2013.
"Hercules" face to face.... - 20 August 2013.
Note the long feathered tarsus - typical of this species - 26 August 2013.
"Hercules" hunting during the nice evening light - 28 August 2013.
Note the powerful claws - 26 August 2013.
"Hercules" just before hunting the mouse - 21 August 2013.
2013 was a very bad LSE-year in my region (district Rostock, province Gnoien) - only 3 pairs with breeding success. 
  • Between 1990 and 2013 the territory pairs varied from 10 to 17 LSE-pairs (average 13 pairs). 
  • The reproduction was highest in the last 24 years in 1999 and 2010 with 10 juv.
LSE-pair hunting together (top the female) - 16 August 2013.
The LSE-female fixed their prey - 16 August 2013.
A problem in my eyes are tagged LSE with satellite transmitter. I will briefly mention some of this...
  • the scientific evolution is indisputable
  • but I have really problems with the "new method" of fixing material (metal rope)
Here the old LSE-male "Panni" (20 years!)  with the metal rope for fitting of GSM transmitter - the usual teflon tape is not used - 08 August 2012.
"Panni" retains his GSM transmitter a long life... - 08 August 2012
Note the rigid "metal basket" with an increased scope of the breast (till 2 cm!) and increased risk of injury during hunting (for example hunting in South Africa - winter ground) - 02 September 2012 ("male A").
There are also problems with transmitter fitting by teflon tapes - this male was tagged 2005 - now eight years later, a band is broken and the transmitter hangs dangerous - Normally, the teflon harness should ripping of breaking point - 23 July 2013.
Conclusion: both methods (metal & teflon) hold incalculable risks for tagged LSE and other raptors - 23 July 2013.
Note the increased scope of "metal basket" (male B) - " male A" and "male B" bred 2012 successfully only 500 m from each other. The fitting of transmitters was on the end of fully-fledged time of young Eagles 2012.
2013 - both males are not more breeding birds! Pure chance? - 02 September 2012.
You should always bear in mind - despite of all the scientific results - this nice Eagle female retains the transmitter for a life cycle...  It hinders the female during the hunting,  during the copulation, during the period of incubation (metal press, eggs jams easily under the basket), during the migration (poorer aerodynamics).....
- 08 August 2012.